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Browns pre-camp notebook: Pryor slash role 'down the road,' McCown clearly the QB starter ... and more from Mike Pettine

Jul 27, 2015 -- 3:28pm

By Tony Grossi | ESPNCleveland.com

 

Photo/ESPN

Extra Points …

Observations from coach Mike Pettine’s informal chat with reporters on Monday

1. The Browns don’t want to bog down Terrelle Pryor with a “slash” role right off the bat, but it certainly is a possibility if he makes the roster first as a receiver. “I don’t want to put the cart before the horse with him,” Pettine said. “He’s got to make the roster. I’ve been a part of that before. With the Jets, we had Brad Smith (a quarterback at Missouri), who was able to wear a lot of different hats for us. I don’t think it’s fair to Terrelle at this point to cast him that way. I and Flip (coordinator John DeFilippo) certainly see the benefits of having that type of athlete on your roster. (And when it comes to needing an emergency quarterback), I’d rather have a 6-4 guy doing it than a 5-7 guy. That’s all down the road.” I asked why not throw him into the mix at backup quarterback, his natural position, rather than receiver and I got the feeling that DeFilippo doesn’t think he can make the team that way. “We’ve talked about it,” Pettine said. “I’m not going to eliminate that. I want him to focus 1000% on receiver. If the circumstances change, then they change.  I’m not going to close the door on it, but for now he’s a wide receiver. Plus, I don’t want a quarterback wearing No. 87. (Laughs).”

2. Nothing major changed on the quarterback depth chart after minicamp. Josh McCown is clearly No. 1, Johnny Manziel clearly No. 2 and Connor Shaw and Thad Lewis are splitting reps at No. 3. Pettine said he’s “not guaranteeing” that McCown will be the opening game starter against the Jets because anything can happen, but “it’s likely.” He said he has no idea when he’ll formally name McCown the starter for the season, but “you’ll have a pretty good sense of who our starters are going to be once we get to Preseason Weeks 2 and 3.”

3. Manziel’s independent work with ESPN analyst and former Tampa Bay coach Jon Gruden was viewed as a positive. Pettine declined to answer my question whether Manziel informed the coaches beforehand that he reached out to Gruden. “I think it’s positive. Any time you have a player that during his down time seeks out somebody well respected in the business to want to improve himself … the fact he sought out Jon and was thinking about football, I see that as nothing but a positive.”

4. All returning injured players should be ready to go for the start of training camp, but may be limited and managed differently over the first weeks of camp. The prominent names here include center Alex Mack (fibula), nose tackle Phil Taylor (knee), safety Tashaun Gipson (hamstring) and receiver Vince Mayle (thumb). “We have an individualized plan for all those guys,” Pettine said. “Everybody will be starting camp in some function. Some will be more limited than others. We’re just trying to coordinate days off.”

5. Pettine laughed off the ESPNCleveland column about a potential tug of war between himself and GM Ray Farmer. “I think it was just the late summer, slow news day,” he said. “The unfortunate thing is when you don’t win, there’s not much credibility there. You can take an individual event (depature of Farmer-appointee Jamil Northcutt, director of player engagement) and it has a negative connotation to it. The truth is, Ray and I work very well together. Do we bat 1.000? We don’t. But when you look at the roster moves made, we are singing out of the same hymnal on virtually every decision. To say there’s a rift, or a power struggle or a tug of war, that would be completely inaccurate.”

6. Pettine is not offended that they are the consensus pick to finish last in the AFC North. “I think there was one (preview publication) that had us fifth,” he quipped. “We’ll use it. But to me that also speaks to the quality of the division that we’re in. The Steelers are explosive on offense, (and) their youth on defense. Baltimore, it would be hard to place them lower than first or second. Cincinnati, all 3 teams are all coming off playoff seasons. How do you put us anywhere (but fourth). That’s fine. We’ll use that. I’d rather (everyone) think of us that way. Go ahead. That we’re a fourth-place team. To me that only works in our favor.”

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Tony Grossi covers the Browns for ESPN 850 WKNR, ESPN 1540 KNR2 and www.espncleveland.com.

He has covered the Browns with distinction since 1984 and is one of 46 voters for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Use the hashtag #HeyTony on Twitter or email your “Hey Tony” questions to tgrossi@goodkarmabrands.com

Follow Tony on Twitter @tonygrossi

 

 

 

Browns Training Camp Preview: Defensive backs

Jul 27, 2015 -- 6:00am

By Tony Grossi | ESPNCleveland.com

 

Photo/AP

(One in a series previewing Browns training camp.)

The Morning Kickoff …

Welcome, football season: About 20 Browns rookies – drafted and undrafted – are in the midst of a one-week orientation in advance of the opening of coach Mike Pettine’s second training camp.

The Browns joined the Ravens and Saints in opening the gates to the 2015 season first on Wednesday.

The remaining 70 Browns veterans report for their conditioning test on July 29. First Browns practice open to the public is July 30. First practice in full pads and uniforms is Aug. 2.

So it’s time to preview Browns training camp – the position groups, the battles, the players to watch, the storylines.

Position: Defensive backs.

Training camp starters: Joe Haden, Tramon Williams, Donte Whitner, Tashaun Gipson.

Reserves: Johnson Bademosi, Ibraheim Campbell (r), Pierre Desir, Darius Eubanks, Kendall James, Charles Gaines (r), Justin Gilbert, Robert Nelson, Micah Pellerin, Jordan Poyer, DeAnte Saunders (r), Brandon Stephens, K’Waun Williams.

Analysis: In the OTA season, players debated how good this unit should be in 2015. Top five in the NFL? Top three? The very best? Last season it led the NFL in limiting opposing quarterbacks to a passer rating of 74.1 (Buffalo was second at 74.5) and topped all secondaries with 99 passes defensed (Houston and Cincinnati were second with 95). Also, the Browns were second with 21 interceptions (San Francisco had 23) and might have finished first if Pro Bowl ball-hawk safety Tashaun Gipson had not missed the final five games with a torn MCL. We could attribute that to a steady diet of unproven or journeyman quarterbacks on the 2014 schedule (Blake Bortles, Derek Carr, Mike Glennon, Ryan Mallett), but the fact is the secondary was outstanding also v. the likes of Ben Roethlisberger (second meeting), Drew Brees, Andy Dalton (first meeting), Matt Ryan and Andrew Luck. The biggest change in this unit was the addition of Green Bay veteran Tramon Williams, 32, to replace departed free agent Buster Skrine. With Gipson healthy and playing for a new contract, Haden approaching his peak, K’Waun Williams and Desir entering their second seasons after showing varying degrees of promise as rookies, it’s safe to say that this is the pride and joy of Pettine’s defense -- clearly one of the best secondaries in the NFL -- and capable of impacting games against any offense.  

Top question: Can Justin Gilbert turn a 180 and play like a No. 8 overall pick?

Like fellow rookie bust Johnny Manziel – both of whom spent the 2014 season finale banished to the visitor’s locker room in Baltimore for team rule violations -- Gilbert talks a good game. At minicamp, he spoke of recommitting himself to his profession and redeeming himself in Year 2. The Browns are reacting to both with the same “show me” attitude. Gilbert spent some time in the offseason working out with Haden and arrived with 10 pounds of added muscle (he’s now 6-0 and 212 pounds). Truly, Gilbert’s physical gifts are what differentiates him from Manziel. Gilbert’s one moment of glory as a rookie – a Pick 6 of Luck in the 25-24 loss to the Colts – demonstrated that he knows what to do with the ball. He had six kickoff returns for touchdowns in his college career at Oklahoma State. Yet the Browns failed to tap that return skill set in his first season. If Gilbert does turn it around and approaches his potential as a cornerback, he could force the Browns to move Tramon Williams to the slot cornerback role (he did it on occasion with Green Bay). Gilbert’s length and foot speed make him an ideal press man corner in Pettine’s defense, which is why Pettine influenced GM Ray Farmer to select Gilbert eighth overall in the 2014 draft.

Noted: Gipson was so good last year in his third pro season that he earned Pro Bowl honors despite missing the last five games with a knee injury. As a restricted free agent, Gipson stewed about his restrictive status during the OTA season before reluctantly signing the Browns’ second-round tender of $2.356 million to avoid a minicamp distraction. Even though he arrived with a tweaked hamstring muscle that kept him out of all workouts, irking Pettine. At minicamp, Gipson said he was willing to bet on himself having an even better fourth season and entering unrestricted free agency in 2016. He cited New England safety Devin McCourty's $47.5 million deal over five years as a reasonable target. The good news for the Browns is that Gipson is supremely motivated to earn a big free agent contract. The bad news is that this could be Gipson’s last season with the Browns.

Other previews

Quarterbacks

Defensive linemen

Running backs

 

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Tony Grossi covers the Browns for ESPN 850 WKNR, ESPN 1540 KNR2 and www.espncleveland.com.

He has covered the Browns with distinction since 1984 and is one of 46 voters for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Use the hashtag #HeyTony on Twitter or email your “Hey Tony” questions to tgrossi@goodkarmabrands.com

Follow Tony on Twitter @tonygrossi

 

 

 

Browns Training Camp Preview: Running backs

Jul 24, 2015 -- 6:00am

By Tony Grossi | ESPNCleveland.com

 

Photo/Getty

(One in a series previewing the Browns’ 2015 training camp.)

The Morning Kickoff …

Welcome, football season: About 20 Browns rookies – drafted and undrafted – are in the midst of a one-week orientation in advance of the opening of coach Mike Pettine’s second training camp.

The Browns joined the Ravens and Saints in opening the gates to the 2015 season first on Wednesday.

The remaining 70 Browns veterans report for their conditioning test on July 29. First Browns practice open to the public is July 30. First practice in full pads and uniforms is Aug. 2.

So it’s time to preview Browns training camp – the position groups, the battles, the players to watch, the storylines.

Position: Running back and fullback.

Training camp starters: Isaiah Crowell and Malcolm Johnson (r).

Reserves: Shaun Draughn, FB Luke Lundy ( r), Duke Johnson (r), Terrance West, Glenn Winston.

Analysis: You can make the case that Crowell and West were a darned good rushing tandem as rookies in 2014 – a combined 1,280 yards on 319 carries (4.0 average), and 12 of the team’s 17 rushing touchdowns, which were fourth-highest in the NFL and most for a Browns team since 1986. So why did the team seriously consider taking backs Todd Gurley or Melvin Gordon with either of their first-round draft picks – Gurley was nabbed 10th by St. Louis and Gordon 15th by San Diego -- and ultimately use a third-round pick on Johnson? The obvious reason is Crowell and West combined for only 20 catches for 151 yards and one TD in 2014, and new coordinator John DeFilippo wanted a better receiver out of the backfield to reintroduce this ignored element to the offense. But DeFilippo also has indicated the desire to “play the hot hand” and lean on a feature back rather than a back by committee. As rookies, Crowell and West had issues with ball security (Crowell) and immaturity (West). So the Browns wanted a new man in the mix, and Johnson comes in as the all-time leading rusher of the running back-rich Miami Hurricanes. In OTAs and minicamp, it appeared that West had surrendered reps to Johnson and Draughn, a December pickup. At minicamp, Johnson sometimes shared the backfield with Crowell (or another back) and was put in motion as a receiver. A two-halfback backfield could be explored more by DeFilippo.

Top question: Will DeFilippo return the blocking fullback to the backfield?

Eric Mangini was the last Browns coach to turn back the clock and use a fullback in the traditional lead-block role. In 2009 and 2010, Mangini unleashed fullback Lawrence Vickers to produce big rushing games from Jerome Harrison and Peyton Hillis. (Incoming President Mike Holmgren later pointed out a commitment to running the ball is fine – as long as it results in wins, and Mangini’s teams won 10 games in two seasons.) As Oakland QB coach, DeFilippo watched the Raiders incorporate fullback Marcel Reece (6-3, 240) as a multi-dimensional fullback who averaged 40 receptions over three years – not as a traditional lead-blocker. The Browns had Reece in mind when they drafted Malcolm Johnson (6-1, 231) in the sixth round. Johnson was mostly a tight end for Mississippi State, but he displayed the versatility at H-back and fullback that DeFilippo wants. So, no, don’t look for a smash-mouth fullback to return to the Browns’ offense.

Noted: In 2014, the Browns signed Ben Tate in free agency and supplemented him with rookies West and Crowell. Part of Tate’s attraction was his experience and the hope he would serve as a leader and mentor in the running backs room. Tate wanted no part of that and eventually was released because of a sour attitude. Still, the intent was reasonable. The running backs room lacks an experienced leader. Draughn, 27, is the oldest, but has been with seven teams in four seasons and is more of a journeyman than a mentor to young backs. Crowell, West and Winston are entering their second years; both Johnsons and Lundy, who is 26, are rookies.

Other previews

Quarterbacks

Defensive linemen

####

Tony Grossi covers the Browns for ESPN 850 WKNR, ESPN 1540 KNR2 and www.espncleveland.com.

He has covered the Browns with distinction since 1984 and is one of 46 voters for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Use the hashtag #HeyTony on Twitter or email your “Hey Tony” questions to tgrossi@goodkarmabrands.com

Follow Tony on Twitter @tonygrossi
 

 

Browns Training Camp Preview: Defensive linemen

Jul 23, 2015 -- 6:00am

By Tony Grossi | ESPNCleveland.com

 

Photo/Browns

(One in a series previewing the Browns’ 2015 training camp.)

The Morning Kickoff …

Welcome, football season: About 20 Browns rookies – drafted and undrafted – are in the midst of a one-week orientation in advance of the opening of coach Mike Pettine’s second training camp.

The Browns joined the Ravens and Saints in opening the gates to the 2015 season first on Wednesday.

The remaining 70 Browns veterans report for their conditioning test on July 29. First Browns practice open to the public is July 30. First practice in full pads and uniforms is Aug. 2.

So it’s time to preview Browns training camp – the position groups, the battles, the players to watch, the storylines.

Position: Defensive line.

Training camp starters: Desmond Bryant, Danny Shelton (r), Randy Starks.

Reserves: Xavier Cooper (r), John Hughes, Ishmaa’ily Kitchen, Jacobbi McDaniel, Jamie Meder, Phil Taylor, Christian Tupou, Billy Winn, Dylan Wynn (r).

Analysis: Mostly because of injuries – but not entirely – this probably was the most under-performing position group last season. Even when healthy, there wasn’t a difference-maker – one player to occupy the attention of offensive game-planners. The Browns recognized that and reinvested in the D-line via the signing of free agent Starks, the re-signing to a multi-year contract of Hughes, and the drafting of Shelton (first round) and Cooper (third). Of these, rookies Shelton and Cooper could have the biggest impact – Shelton against the run, at which the defense ranked 32nd in 2014, and Cooper against the pass as an interior rusher, a weapon missing last year. Shelton was the second college nose tackle taken in the first round by the Browns in five years. Shelton was the 12th overall pick; Taylor was 21st overall in 2011. They also drafted Hughes, who could play the nose, in the third round in 2012, and claimed Kitchen, a pure nose, off waivers from Baltimore in 2012. So many nose tackles. So few tackles of ball-carriers.

Top question: Could Pettine be contemplating a switch to a 4-3 base alignment?

As defensive coordinator with the New York Jets and Buffalo Bills, Pettine used a four-man front as his base alignment because that’s where the elite talent was. The Browns have enough bodies to convert to a 4-3, but it’s not going to be the defense’s base alignment. At minicamp, Pettine quipped that his base is more “3 ½-3 ½” because he prefers to use an outside linebacker as the primary pass rush-end. Bottom line: It appears Pettine’s defense in Year 2 still is in transition. Coaches like to refer to this a “hybrid” 3-4 and they profess to like the versatility and unpredictability of switching back and forth based on down and distance. In truth, such “versatility” usually is an indication that a defense has neither the elite linemen nor the elite linebackers to specialize in one system. It’s like having “two good quarterbacks” – meaning, you don’t have one.

Noted: In May of 2014, the Browns exercised the fifth-year option of Taylor’s original rookie contract. The transaction guaranteed Taylor’s 2015 salary of $5.477 million if he were on the roster at the start of the 2015 league year in March. Even tough Taylor had two surgical procedures on his right knee in October and November, the Browns triggered the guarantee in March. Then they drafted Shelton six weeks later. I don’t get it. This team drafts more nose tackles (and centers) high in the draft than any team in the NFL. And yet its defense against the run consistently ranks among the worst. Taylor’s guaranteed salary is tantamount to a free ticket to the final roster. Yet the Browns have capable nose tackles behind Shelton in Kitchen and Hughes. When you have plenty of cap room because of no elite quarterback eating up cap space, you have the luxury of position duplicity.

Previous previews

Quarterbacks

####

Tony Grossi covers the Browns for ESPN 850 WKNR, ESPN 1540 KNR2 and www.espncleveland.com.

He has covered the Browns with distinction since 1984 and is one of 46 voters for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Use the hashtag #HeyTony on Twitter or email your “Hey Tony” questions to tgrossi@goodkarmabrands.com

Follow Tony on Twitter @tonygrossi
 

 

Browns Training Camp Preview: Quarterbacks

Jul 22, 2015 -- 6:00am

By Tony Grossi | ESPNCleveland.com

 

(First in a series previewing the Browns’ 2015 training camp.)

The Morning Kickoff …

Welcome, football season: The Browns are in first place. Well, tied with the Ravens and Saints.

Those teams were the first to have rookies report to camp on Wednesday. It’s basically an orientation to review what the rookies learned in OTAs and minicamps. Browns veterans report a week later on July 29. First Browns practice open to the public is July 30. First practice in full pads and uniforms is Aug. 2.

So it’s time to preview Browns training camp – the position groups, the battles, the players to watch, the storylines. As usual, quarterback is at the top of the list of positions to watch.

Position: Quarterback.

Training camp starter: Josh McCown.

Reserves: Thad Lewis, Johnny Manziel, Connor Shaw.

Analysis: McCown, 36, won1 of 11 starts with Tampa Bay last year and was given a $6.5 million guarantee by the Browns in free agency. Meanwhile, Cleveland native Brian Hoyer, 29, won 7 of 13 starts for the Browns last year – and was not even given a face-to-face exit meeting with GM Ray Farmer. (Hoyer signed with Houston as a free agent and is the front-runner to win the Texans’ starting quarterback job.)  It should be noted that coach Mike Pettine did not pound a table and endorse Hoyer’s return. Maybe losing 6 of his last 7 games in 2014 caused Pettine to defer the QB decision to new coordinator John DeFilippo. “Flip” was Oakland QB coach in 2007 when McCown won 2 of 9 starts for the Raiders. So the Browns chose to anoint McCown their “bridge quarterback” to the Next Great Hope. Barring unforeseen circumstances, McCown will be the 23rd quarterback to start a game for the Browns when they open their season Sept. 13 in MetLife Stadium against the New York Jets. McCown’s willingness to mentor Manziel and not compete against him in cut-throat fashion – apparently Hoyer’s greatest sin – made him an attractive “get” for the Browns. In 12 NFL seasons, McCown’s best year was 2004 – 2004! – when he won 6 of 13 starts for the Arizona Cardinals and had a passer rating of 74.1.

Top question: Where does Manziel fall in the pecking order?

Manziel will enter camp No. 2 on the unofficial depth chart. When Pettine was asked at minicamp in June if Manziel was closer to No. 1 or No. 3, he awkwardly sidestepped the question. Given their limited play time as rookies – Manziel played seven quarters and started two games, Shaw played four quarters and started one – Shaw was more impressive, displaying command of the position and offense and respect of his teammates. But in OTAs and minicamp, Manziel received all second-team reps. Shaw and Lewis were limited to scraps. Manziel clearly is a favorite of owner Jimmy Haslam and Farmer. Whether Shaw can overcome those obstacles and earn a promotion depends on play time in preseason games.

Noted: Lewis, a former Browns No. 3 quarterback with the Pat Shurmur Browns in 2012, moved on to Buffalo, where he won 2 of 5 starts (81.0 rating) in 2013 when Pettine was Bills defensive coordinator. When Lewis set at least one passing record at Duke, his offensive coordinator was Kurt Roper, who was added to the Browns’ coaching staff as a senior offensive assistant.

Tony Grossi covers the Browns for ESPN 850 WKNR, ESPN 1540 KNR2 and www.espncleveland.com.

He has covered the Browns with distinction since 1984 and is one of 46 voters for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Use the hashtag #HeyTony on Twitter or email your “Hey Tony” questions to tgrossi@goodkarmabrands.com

Follow Tony on Twitter @tonygrossi

 

 

 

Is the tug of war on between Browns GM and head coach?

Jul 21, 2015 -- 6:00am

By Tony Grossi | ESPNCleveland.com

 

Photo/USAToday

The Morning Kickoff …

One and done: The departure of Dr. Jamil Northcutt as Browns director of player engagement after 15 months won’t make a ripple with their football-starved fan base.

Northcutt was a nonentity to fans. A former college linebacker at the University of Mississippi, he didn’t make (or miss) a tackle, or directly influence what happened on game days.

But in the politics of Browns football, Northcutt was an inordinately major “player” in the 2014 season – a confidante of GM Ray Farmer and, it turned out, a thorn in the side of Mike Pettine’s coaching staff.

And Northcutt’s ouster – which the club is characterizing as a mutual parting – reflects a seeping rift between Pettine and the GM who is facing a four-game suspension for breaking NFL rules by texting, and badgering, coaches in the press box booth during games.

On game days, Northcutt had an undefined role on the sideline. Sources have told ESPN Cleveland that Northcutt was a recipient of Farmer’s in-game texting, and that he relayed messages from Farmer to the coaches. Another source said that was absolutely false.

There is a story of Northcutt having a confrontation with defensive coordinator Jim O’Neil during that horrible 23-7 loss to the Houston Texans on Nov. 16, in which nondescript Houston running backs Alfred Blue and Jonathan Grimes combined for 49 carries and 210 yards on the ground. O’Neil did not take kindly to Northcutt’s intrusion during the difficult day, sources said.

That unexpected loss, with the Browns sitting atop the AFC North at 6-3, was the beginning of the end of the 2014 season.

There is also a story of Northcutt having a “conversation” with offensive line coach Andy Moeller concerning the non-use of reserve guard Vinston Painter after the injury to center Alex Mack. According to a source, that was outside the boundaries of Northcutt’s job description.

The doctor is in: The position of “director of player engagement” or “director of player programs” continues to evolve with NFL teams. The job entails assisting players, particularly incoming rookies, in making the transition to life in the NFL and life after the NFL.

Mundane tasks like scheduling visits to the Ohio DMV and lining up real estate agents coincide with regular meetings to educate players on financial traps and NFL substance abuse and personal conduct policies. The position of “director of player engagement” has become a season-long extension of the ever-enlarging NFL Rookie Symposium program.

Many teams fill the position with former players, who have “been there, done that.” When Farmer replaced former Browns tight end Aaron Shea with Northcutt, he termed Northcutt’s appointment “a very important hire.”

Northcutt held three college degrees from Mississippi, including a doctorate in higher education earned in 2013.

Northcutt came to the Browns after six years as assistant athletics director for internal operations at Mississippi. Before that, he was with the Kansas City Chiefs as player development coordinator while Farmer was director of pro personnel director with the Chiefs.

While Northcutt was eminently qualified to deal with “player engagement,” the team had an unusually difficult year keeping some players “engaged” in their jobs.

Northcutt inherited the serially suspended Josh Gordon. But three rookies had particular trouble adapting from college life to the demands and challenges of professional football – cornerback Justin Gilbert, quarterback Johnny Manziel and running back Terrance West.

It may be unfair to tag Northcutt with the respective transgressions of the three rookies. Then again, it’s hard to recall a Browns’ rookie class that had more high-profile knuckleheadedness.

Going forward: I’m not saying that Northcutt’s departure represents a turning point in the relationship between Farmer and Pettine. Actually, that occurred when Farmer texted coaches in the booth during games, which was counter-productive to the team’s ability to win and compromised Farmer’s credibility with the coaches and, to a degree, the players.

But Northcutt’s departure is not insignificant, either.

Neither Farmer nor Pettine have the job security under owner Jimmy Haslam to pull a power play. In a way, each still needs the other to succeed.

But the tug of war appears to be on.

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Tony Grossi covers the Browns for ESPN 850 WKNR, ESPN 1540 KNR2 and www.espncleveland.com.

He has covered the Browns with distinction since 1984 and is one of 46 voters for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Use the hashtag #HeyTony on Twitter or email your “Hey Tony” questions to tgrossi@goodkarmabrands.com

Follow Tony on Twitter @tonygrossi
 

 

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